Tag Archives: AT&T

Reflections from the 2017 Mentoring Summit

In February, we sent a team of Summer Search staff to the 2017 National Mentoring Summit. Two members of our team, Boston mentor Claire Marian and Bay Area mentor Alysa Delgado shared what they learned in this co-authored guest blog post.


This year, we (Claire Marian and Alysa Delgado) had the opportunity to represent Summer Search alongside our colleagues Salem Valentino, Stacey Thompson, Alex Bartz, Stacy Barr, and Eliza Arai Carrington at the National Mentoring Summit in Washington, DC.

SS-last-dayFrom left to right: Alysa Delgado, Claire Marian, Alex Bartz, Stacy Barr, Salem Valentino, and Stacey Thompson.

Continue reading Reflections from the 2017 Mentoring Summit

Brackets For Good

FINAL UPDATE (3/24/17): Unfortunately, Summer Search’s winning streak in Brackets For Good ended today. We fell to Urban Teachers in the Engaged Eight round at the very last second with a score of 12,372 to 12,261.

Thank you to AT&T for sponsoring such an exciting tournament, and to everyone who contributed during our Cinderella run. Thanks to you, we made it so much farther than we expected and raised more than $32,000 for Summer Search!


We’re going to the Big Dance! Philanthropy’s big dance, that is.

Brackets for Good is an online fundraising tournament where 64 national nonprofits compete for donations. The winning organization will receive a grand prize of a $100,000 grant courtesy of AT&T, the tournament’s presenting sponsor. #BFGUSA #BFG17

And Summer Search made the field of 64! Here’s how you can support us in this competitive giving contest. Continue reading Brackets For Good

Changing the Narrative: It Takes a Village

Here at Summer Search, we are developing plans to better support our Black and Latino men through our Males of Color Initiative. Specifically, that means enhancing our outreach and enrollment practices to increase the number of Black and Latino male students referred to, and enrolled in Summer Search.

We are also encouraged to see that, across the country, there is a groundswell of recognition of the systemic and institutionalized barriers surrounding these young men, and the need to better serve them. Continue reading Changing the Narrative: It Takes a Village